The Pineapple Jukebox Dance Show

Q Theatre Loft, 305 Queen St, Auckland

20/02/2013 - 23/02/2013

Auckland Fringe 2013

Production Details



INSERT COIN AND CHOOSE YOUR DANCE!

Pineapple Productions, the Auckland Fringe Festival and the Q Theatre present

THE PINEAPPLE JUKEBOX DANCE SHOW

Directed by the choreographer Julie Anterrieu

Have you ever dreamed of having the power to choose the performances you want to see? The Pineapple Jukebox Dance Show lets you do just that from February 20th to 23rd 2012. To be performed in Auckland for the first time, The Pineapple Jukebox Dance Show is a show like no other brought to you by the dance company Pineapple Productions. Created by the French Choreographer Julie Anterrieu, this interactive dance show will be on for four evenings at the Q Theatre early next year as part of the Auckland Fringe Festival 2013.

Pineapple Production’s choreographer, Julie Anterrieu has choreographed and performed in contemporary, jazz and Broadway shows for 15 years across Paris, New York and Auckland, winning several awards in France and New Zealand for her work. Staying true to her versatile training and passion for anything dance, Julie decided to produce a show that allows the audience to experience different dance styles.

For the past year, Pineapple Productions has been living up to those principles with creations that include successful and always evolving performances such as dancing French Cancan for a Champagne launch for Jean-Paul Gaultier and the Rugby World Cup, Flashmobs for brands such as Bagabond, Hallensteins, Glassons and even the Auckland City Hospital, as well as Vintage choreographies for private functions and the Very Vintage Day Out. Her new production – The Pineapple Jukebox Dance Show – is an interactive dance show taking on real Jukebox rules, placing the audience in full control. From a pre-set list of songs, the audience gets to decide which dance they want to see the dancers perform!

Trained in jazz, contemporary, modern dance, ballet, musical theatre and lindy hop, the Pineapple dancers are certainly talented and also full of surprises. The dynamic dancers switch from French Cancan to Classical Ballet, fast-paced Charleston to slow acrobatic chair moves, vintage high heeled pin up to grunge contemporary, and this is all skillfully achieved in a matter of minutes. They are crazy enough to refine these diverse pieces, unsure of which ones they will perform and what the running order will be.

The Jukebox Dance Show presents a different set every time, making each experience truly unique. It’s simple. Insert coin. Choose your dance. Then sit back and enjoy!

This show is part of the Auckland Fringe Festival, which runs from 15th February to 10th March 2013. For more information on the Auckland Fringe Festival 2013 go to www.aucklandfringe.co.nz

THE PINEAPPLE JUKEBOX DANCE SHOW plays 20-21-22-23  February 2013, 7 pm 

Duration: 60 minutes Venue: Q Theatre – The Loft, Auckland City.

Tickets: $20, $18 Concession, $10 Children, $18 Group +6, $18 Fringe Artist. (booking fees apply)

Bookings: Q Theatre – www.qtheatre.co.nz or 09 309 9771

For more information contact:

Pineapple Productions/ Geraldine Clermont (Producer) 02102856523

Geraldine.pineappleproductions@gmail.com

www.pineappleproductionsdance.com

 

Producer/dancer
02102856523 
Facebook: pineappleproductionsdance
Twitter: dancepineapple
Vimeo: pineappleproductions
 




1 hr

Choose a dance and then enjoy

Review by 21st Feb 2013

Choose your dance. Then sit back and enjoy!

Enter the Loft Theatre at Q, where a beautiful Wurlitzer jukebox, complete with moving bubbles and grandiose splendour, sits in the corner – though it doesn’t appear to play the music for the show. This is the key object in The Pineapple Jukebox Dance Show, and it provides a reference point for the structure of the show, directed and choreographed by Julie Anterrieu, a French choreographer of commercial dance routines who shows an exuberance and passion for dance.

The show is not immediately identifiable as belonging to the Fringe. It looks and feels like corporate entertainment, with 18 dance numbers in an array of commercial styles listed on the programme contained in the envelope you are given on entry. Nine lucky audience members receive a coin with a number. If you are one of them, you get to select a dance from the programme, and the number on the coin is the order in which your dance will be performed.

Proceedings are kept rolling  along by embellished repartee from foxy MC Phlossy Roxx, and although the pace is a little tentative, the audience quickly grasps the concept at play. Our hostess provides chitchat and games between items, with assistance from audience volunteers to fill in the time needed for costume changes. 

The first work turns out to be a lyrical solo titled America, danced by the voluptuous Nicole de Malmanche, in a white flowing frock like something Marilyn Monroe might have worn (costume designs by Coco Columbine and Greta Garment) to music by Lana Del Rey. This  shows off an easy feel for the choreographic style,  some pretty technique and an overt pleasure in performing, hallmarks which continue to be exhibited by all ten dancers throughout the medley of dance styles.

Highlights include two truly genuinely authentic French styled numbers — a 1960s go-go trio, Gogo-YeYe, to music by April March, and the disco dance Cloclo Medley, with 6 dancers performing to a mashup of four French pop songs by Claude Francois. Julie Anterrieu shines as a performer in both of these.

Also guaranteed to be a highlight is the guest performance of the evening, on this occasion the popping duo Balancing Act, Lawrence and Mike who specialise in a joyous human dialogue comprised of spinning and moving in and out of sync with one another.

The final number, a chair routine to a classic tune by Gerry Rafferty, spins out a line that runs through my mind as I am leaving: “ I’ve a feeling that something aint right”. On pondering this refrain, I realise that what could be seen as an uneasy meld of mainstream dance, set in the avant garde space of a Fringe Festival becomes just that, not quite right, not quite Fringe, yet decidedly thought provoking all the same.

Comments

D February 24th, 2013

I went to this show on Friday the 22nd of Feb and I thought it was incredible. It was exceptionally well produced, everything ran very smoothly it was obvious to me that the level of organisation was very high and to be respected as I don't often see shows of this nature run this well. So even before the dancers appeared on stage I was impressed!! Once the dances were chosen (9 out of a whopping 20 that Julie Anterrieu created, wow) and the girls got to perform them I was so taken with how polished, creative, artistic and beautiful they were, so much to be appreciated with the girls having no idea how many choreography's they may have to perform that night if any at all, for those I saw multiple times I was in awe of how they looked so in control and happy to be performing on stage. 

This show inspired my creativity and has made me want to dance again, I loved it and respect the work ethic this team have put in to create such a fabulous show that you could watch again and again and never be bored of. 

Well done to you all, you are amazing. If the worst comment you got was that it wasn't fringe enough I wouldn't worry too much as there is life beyond the fringe and many more opportunities to come from your hard work and fantastic dance skills I'm sure! 

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